Rah Rah in the rain

Saturday, January 29, 2022

 
Photo by Leslie Boyd

Echo Lake Elementary PTA president Kaija Dalan and her kids at a Shoreline corner on a rainy night.



 

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Bragging rights for Highlanders after cross-town wrestling match Friday

By Clark Norton

It was a classic rivalry Friday night, January 28, 2022 as the Shorewood Stormrays hosted the Shorecrest Highlanders in their final contest of the regular season. Shorewood was looking to continue their winning streak in the series, having won the past two meetings and eleven of the past twelve.

Wrestling began at 126 pounds when Shorewood Senior captain Quincy Laflin dropped a weight class to face Shorecrest’s Joseph Martinez. Although Martinez was the favorite on paper, currently ranked ninth in the state, Laflin took over the match. Laflin took Martinez down early and often as he steamrolled his way to a dominating 12-3 victory.  

Next up, at 132 pounds, was a battle of freshmen between Stormray Masa Taura and Highlander August King. Taura took advantage of a small mistake by King to grab the pin and give Shorewood an early 10-0 lead in the team score.

At 138 pounds Highlander Jacob Lougee got his team right back into the match as he solved the puzzle of James Nottingham for a second round pin. 

Senior Thomas Rhodes, ranked #2 in the state at 145 pounds, continued his personal streak of never having lost to a Shorewood wrestler as he methodically man-handled his opponent for a first round pin, giving Shorecrest their first lead of the night at 12-10.

Shorewood sent out their own top-notch wrestler, 6th ranked Isaac VanHorn, at 152 pounds. It took a bit for VanHorn to figure out his opponent, but once he did there was no stopping him. VanHorn’s first round pin pulled the Stormrays back into the lead. The Shorewood lead disappeared almost instantly though when Highlander Max Rutledge snatched it away with a pin at 160 pounds.  

After a win at 170 pounds the visiting team held a narrow 24-16 lead with half the weight classes to go.  Shorecrest coach Bryan Officer made a last minute substitution at 182 pounds, inserting sophomore Malachi Stream into the varsity line-up. Stream took full advantage of his opportunity, taking an 8 to 3 lead over Shorewood’s Nathaniel Hernandez into the third period. Starting in the bottom position, Stream was able to get a huge reversal and pin that brought the Shorecrest fans to their feet.

#1 ranked wrestler Hunter Tibodeau scored his fourteenth pin of the season, in just seventeen matches, to keep Shorewood alive. Stormray teammates RJ Buchheit and Milan Johnson got pins of their own at 220 and 285 pounds to pull Shorewood back into the lead at 34-30.  

However, it was too little, too late for Shorewood. The Highlanders received two forfeits around a pin by Kaiju Fergerson at 113 pounds to sweep the final three weights and go home with a 48-34 victory and cross-town bragging rights.

Shorewood 34 - Shorecrest 48
@ Shorewood High School
*Match began at 126 pounds

106: Micah Fergerson SC win by forfeit
113: Kaiju Fergerson SC pinned Owen Mulder1:42
120: George Fernandez SC win by forfeit
*126: Quincy Laflin SW maj. dec. Joseph Martinez 12-3
132: Masa Taura SW pinned August King 1:23
138: Jacob Lougee SC pinned James Nottingham 3:15
145: Thomas Rhodes SC pinned Oli Dalan 0:54
152: Isaac VanHorn SW pinned Finn Kennedy 1:19
160: Max Rutledge SC pinned Addison Brueck 1:34
170: Peter Grimm SC win by inj. def. Alberto Solano
182: Malachi Stream SC pinned Nathaniel Hernandez 4:40
195: Hunter Tibodeau SW pinned Evan Claar 1:10
220: RJ Buchheit SW pinned Jessie Gigrich 0:42
285: Milan Johnson SW pinned Brett Gigrich 1:08

Shorewood Record: 7-6 Overall, 3-2 WESCO 2A/3A


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Gloria's Birds: LESSER Scaup?!?

Photo copyright Gloria Z. Nagler

Photo copyright Gloria Z. Nagler

What slanderous person gave me that second-class moniker? You might know, photog: can I sue?

(Actually, Sybil's my first scaup image of any kind, lessor or greater! Didn't even know I'd photographed a scaup 'till I looked her up in my bird book:)

--Gloria Z. Nagler


 

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ICHS distributes COVID-19 test kits to community organizations

From left: Zafu Aragai from the Tigrean Community Center looks on while Ramon Mallari and Caitlin Stougard load boxes of COVID-19 test kits in the trunk of her car outside of the ICHS Shoreline Medical and Dental Clinic. 

On January 28, 2022 International Community Health Services (ICHS) began distributing 5,400 rapid at-home COVID-19 test kits to representatives from 16 community organizations in front of the ICHS Shoreline Medical and Dental Clinic.

This was ICHS’ first concerted effort to deliver COVID-19 at-home test kits to trusted community partners to reach medically underserved communities across the Puget Sound region. Recipients included nonprofit social service organizations as well as places of worship serving first-generation immigrant communities.

Reactions were jubilant. All the representatives shared how difficult it has been for their members and clients to find rapid test kits during the surge of COVID-19 cases driven by the Omicron variant.

“These test kits mean safety”
Sieng Douangdala, community engagement manager at Kandelia, arrived early to pick up their boxes. With a plan in place to put test kits in Kandelia’s weekly food bags given to Seattle World School students, they will find their way to hundreds of families across Seattle.

“This is a great opportunity for us,” said Douangdala. “We know that the federal government is issuing test kits, but there are four [kits] per household, and a lot of our families have five, six, all the way up to 12 people in the household.”

And not only that, but many of their clients have found the English websites completely inaccessible, and due to transportation, internet, or language barriers have been unable to find COVID-19 testing during the Omicron surge.

“These test kits mean safety,” Douangdala added.

Zafu Aragai, from the Tigrean Community Center, drove up from Skyway to pick up test kits from ICHS. She’s heard from church members who have driven for “like five, six hours looking for COVID-19 testing.”

“This Saturday we're gonna work on instructions,” said Aragai. “Write down bullet points, we’re trying to draw little illustrations so people can see. We’re going to do a demonstration so that people know how to go about it and do it properly.”

  Caitlin Stougard, ICHS Patient Navigator Supervisor, loads boxes of COVID-19 test kits in the trunk of Sieng Douangdala's car in front of the ICHS Shoreline Medical and Dental Clinic. 

“These can’t wait”
As part of the Biden administration’s “Path Out of the Pandemic” COVID-19 Action Plan, community health centers like ICHS that serve medically underserved communities will receive at-home self-test kits directly from the federal government to distribute to patients and communities for free.

When a large shipment arrived on Monday, January 24, ICHS quickly leapt into action, said Sherryl Grey, ICHS director of community services.

“These can’t wait,” she added. “People need these now.”

Members of the ICHS community health services team reached out to community partner organizations that ICHS has worked with in the past, nonprofits that make mutual referrals, and community organizations like the Tigrean Community Center that serve as anchors for communities facing barriers to healthcare access.

As a community health center, ICHS’ work has always been to go out into the community and meet people where they are, Grey said. These test kits are only the most recent example of ICHS’ dedication to serving the community.

COVID-19 testing safety and guidelines

If you test positive from an over-the-counter COVID-19 test kit, please report it immediately by calling the Washington state COVID-19 hotline at (800) 525-0127. Language assistance is available. The hotline is open Monday, 6:00am - 10:00pm, and Tuesday-Saturday, 6:00am - 6:00pm.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued warnings that fake COVID-19 test kits are being sold online. Make sure the test you’re buying is authorized by the FDA. Follow these Federal Trade Commission tips if you’re shopping online for COVID test kits and related items.

ICHS administers walk-in COVID-19 vaccines at ICHS pharmacies in Shoreline and Seattle (International District and Holly Park neighborhoods). Non-ICHS patients may walk in Monday through Friday 9:00am - 4:00pm. Visit the ICHS website to learn more.



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Wenatchee jumbo ferry back in service

Wenatchee photo courtesy WSDOT

For the first time in more than a year, all three of our largest Jumbo Mark II-class ferries are available for operation after repairs and successful sea trials on Wenatchee wrapped up earlier this week. 

The vessel was pulled from service in November 2020 for scheduled maintenance and was preparing to return in April 2021, when an engine caught fire while the boat was conducting sea trials with no passengers on board.

As a reminder, WSF is still operating on alternate service schedules on most runs until further notice as there are many employees out due to the recent COVID-19 omicron surge. 

Should crewing allow, a second boat will be put into service on the Seattle/Bainbridge, Edmonds/Kingston and Mukilteo/Clinton routes on a daily basis. Riders are encouraged to sign up for rider alerts to receive updates on what schedule we’re operating on each route each day.



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Online and mail voter registration deadline for February Special Election – January 31, 2022

King County Director of Elections Julie Wise
with King County Councilmember Rod Dembowski
The February Special election is quickly approaching with ballots due to drop boxes by 8pm sharp or postmarked by Tuesday, February 8, 2022. 

The deadline to register to vote online or by mail (received, not postmarked) is Monday, January 31.

After the deadline has passed, voters can still register to vote, update their registration or signature, receive a replacement ballot, or use an assistive device at King County Elections Headquarters in Renton.

About 1.2 million registered voters are eligible to vote in this election, primarily weighing in on ballot measures impacting schools and parks. All participating voters should have received their ballot by Monday, January 24. 

Those who have not received their ballot or misplaced it should request one online or give King County Elections a call at 206-296-VOTE (8683) during business hours. Registered voters can also download and print their ballot online through the accessible online ballot marking program.

Voters may opt to receive their ballot and voting materials in Chinese, Korean, Spanish, and Vietnamese and King County Elections provides customer service in over twenty languages.

To be eligible to vote, you must be:
  • A citizen of the United States
  • A legal resident of Washington State
  • At least 18 years old by Election Day
  • Not currently serving a sentence of total confinement under the jurisdiction of the Department of Corrections for a Washington felony conviction
  • Not currently incarcerated for a federal or out-of-state felony conviction


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Call for Artists: An evening of art for STEM

The Edmonds SnoKing Branch of the American Association of University Women (AAUW), is hosting an Art Show and Silent Auction. We are raising scholarship funds for women studying Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. 

We are seeking 30 local artists to showcase their works to event ticket holders on March 25, 2022, at the Edmonds Center for the Arts.

Call for Artists

We are now accepting applications from artists. This flyer has all the information you need, as well as links to the application form. Email AAUWartshow@gmail.com, or use our Contact Us form for more information.



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Cartoon by Whitney Potter: The Iron Age


Previous cartoons by Whitney Potter HERE



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Case updates January 28, 2022

COVID-19 Updates since Wednesday 1/26/2022
 

United States  

  
  • Total cases 73,512,366
  • Cases in past 7 days - 4,044,240
  • Total deaths 876,632

Washington State

  • Friday, January 28, 2022: Due to the current surge in COVID-19 cases, Department of Health is experiencing substantial slowdowns in our data systems. This will result in delays in reporting cases, hospitalizations, and deaths


King county

Levels of Community Transmission:
based on the number of new cases per 100,000 residents in the past 7 days:

High: ≥ 100
Substantial: 50-99
Moderate: 10-49
Low: < 10

  • Total confirmed cases 315,148 -  6,963 new   
  • Cases in past 7 days - 22,568 
  • Total hospitalizations 10,553 -    -140 new
  • Hospitalizations in past 7 days - 300  
  • Total deaths 2,311 -  -3 new   
  • Level of community transmission HIGH  

Seattle 
  • Total confirmed cases 84,183  -  1,676 new   
  • Cases in past 7 days - 5,507   
  • Total hospitalizations 2,285  -  -31 new   
  • Total deaths 557  -   0 new  
  • Level of community transmission HIGH  

Shoreline  
  • Total confirmed cases 7,095 -   204 new  
  • Cases in past 7 days - 488    
  • Total hospitalizations 287 -   -6 new   287
  • Hospitalizations in past 7 days - 4
  • Total deaths 122 - 0 new
  • Level of community transmission: HIGH

Lake Forest Park 
  • Total confirmed cases 1,253 - 30 new   
  • Cases in past 7 days - 108 
  • Total hospitalizations 28 -    -1 new
  • Hospitalizations in past 7 days - 1
  • Total deaths 5  - 0 new
  • Level of community transmission: HIGH


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Local students on President's Honor Roll at University of Wyoming

University of Wyoming
January 27, 2022 - The University of Wyoming lists the following nonresident students on the 2021 fall semester President’s Honor Roll.

The President’s Honor Roll consists of regularly enrolled undergraduates who earned a 4.0 (“A”) grade-point average for the semester. To be eligible, students must have been enrolled for a minimum of 12 credit hours taken for letter grades.

Washington

Lake Forest Park 
  • Benjamin H. Newell

Seattle

  • Claire Elizabeth Bartlett


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Local students achieve academic distinction at Whitman College

WALLA WALLA, Wash. (January 26, 2022) - Local students earned academic distinction for the most recent semester at Whitman College. 

This recognition is given to students who have completed a minimum of 12 credits, passed all credits attempted, and have earned a grade-point average of 3.5 or higher on no fewer than nine graded credits during the semester.

HOMETOWN, STATE; NAME, HIGH SCHOOL 

Lake Forest Park, WA
  • Madeleine Stolp, Shorecrest High School
  • Sylvia Wang, Shorecrest High School

Seattle, WA
  • Derivan Dockter, O'Dea High School
  • Philip Ratner, Garfield High School
  • Olivia Wing, Ingraham High School

Shoreline, WA
  • Avery Mangel, Shorewood High School

About Whitman College: Situated within the rich and complex landscape and history of the Walla Walla Valley, Whitman College provides a rigorous liberal arts education of the highest quality to passionate and engaged students from diverse backgrounds. Whitman students develop their intellectual and creative capacities in a supportive scholarly community that prioritizes student learning within and beyond our classrooms. We help each student translate their deep local, regional, and global experiences into ethical and meaningful lives of purpose.



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Register your youth for Shoreline Little League

Shoreline Little League is the local Little League for Shoreline and Lake Forest Park Washington for tee ball, softball, and baseball.

REGISTER TODAY!
Time is running out to register for the 2022 Spring Season for Softball and Baseball!

Registration deadlines are:
  • 2/7/22 for AAA, Majors and Juniors SOFTBALL DIVISIONS
  • 2/21/22 for A and AA SOFTBALL DIVISIONS
  • 2/21/22 for AAA, & Majors BASEBALL DIVISIONS
  • and 3/21/22 for A, AA baseball, and Tee ball
Let's Play Ball!



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Notes from Shoreline Council meeting January 24, 2022

Reporter Pam Cross
Shoreline City Council Meeting
January 24, 2022

Notes by Pam Cross

The remote meeting was called to order at 7:00pm by Mayor Scully. All Councilmembers were present.

The agenda was approved by unanimous consent.

Report of the City Manager, Debbie Tarry

COVID-19 Update

The extremely transmissible omicron variant is showing decreasing transmission rates, but transmissions are still significantly higher than in many of the previous waves. King County hospitalizations are now starting to decrease but are still higher than at any other point in the pandemic.


Cloth masks should have at least two layers.

Testing capacity is still strained. Don’t go to emergency rooms for testing because this impedes their ability to care for those with medical emergencies.

Enhanced Shelter Update

The City receives quarterly updates on the shelter, but due to the transition we are still waiting for some of the information from the third and fourth quarters of 2021. Shelter capacity remains at 60.


The shelter has met their required goals that were part of the contract with the City: they have to provide at least 200 bed nights per year and complete 50 case management referrals which they did in 2021.

We will provide more information in the future.

RADAR


REMEMBER TO VOTE!


Public Reminders
  • Councilmembers will attend the Association of Washington Cities’ “City Action Days” virtual conference on Jan 27.
  • The PRCS/Tree Board will hold a remote meeting on Jan 27 at 7pm

Council Reports

Deputy Mayor Robertson attended the North KingCo Coalition on Homelessness meeting. They discussed the upcoming Point in Time Count that tries to get a grasp of the current homeless population. They are aware it is not a perfect process and are creating a plan now for the count that will be conducted in March. They were provided with an update on severe weather sites in North KingCo. The DM also attended her first meeting as an alternate for the Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC).

CM Roberts reported PSRC is seeking public comment on the draft Regional Transportation Plan. Anyone on the Council or any member of the public can comment on the plan. Go to psrc.org to make a comment.

Mayor Scully attended the WRIA 8 meeting which is the salmon recovery council. There is an exciting package of funding proposals that the Governor has sent to the legislature. We are hopeful a lot of that stuff gets enacted.

I’m delighted to announce the Councilmembers who have volunteered for committees for the coming year. These are all outside committees that we participate in. It’s a way for Shoreline to participate in regional governance as well as within our City. It’s voluntary and I’m grateful for Councilmembers who step up for it.

  • CM Roberts has agreed to remain as the delegate to Public Issues Committee with CM Ramsdell serving as the alternate; 
  • CM McConnell is going to remain on SeaShore with CM Pobee as the alternate; 
  • Mayor Scully is staying on WRIA 8 and the Lake Ballinger Forum with CM Mork as the alternate for WRIA 8. 
  • CM Mork has volunteered to serve on the K4C which is the environmental umbrella organization;
  • DM Robertson is going to be joined by CM Ramsdell on the North King County Task Force.

Public Comment

Jackie Kurle, Shoreline
I’m glad about success story at The Oaks, and hope to hear more of these successes.

Abdi Ahmed, Shoreline, Family Advocate for Shoreline School District
Turning Point is very useful for families of East Africans and is most appreciated by the families.

Note: Turning Point provides after-school tutoring, community meals and STEM programs, working to close the equity gap for students in the Shoreline School District.

The Consent Calendar was approved unanimously 7-0.

Action Item 8(a) Action on Resolution No. 486 Declaring Support for Shoreline School District Ballot Proposition No. 1 – Replacement of Expiring Levy for Educational Programs and Operations and Proposition No. 2 – Replacement of Expiring Capital Levy for Technology Improvement and Support

Prior to the presentation, Mayor Scully disclosed that his wife, Sarah Cohen, is a member of the Shoreline School Board. This is an unpaid position so there is no financial incentive for the Mayor to support this ballot.

No other disclosures.

Christina Arcidy, Management Analyst made the brief presentation

This was discussed at the Jan 10 Council meeting. There is no resource or financial impact to declaring support for the Shoreline School District Ballot. Council has done this in the past in support of other school district or special district measures that Council believes will support the overall well-being of the community.

Staff recommends that City Council adopt Resolution No. 486.

An opportunity for Public Comment will follow the staff presentation and precede the Council discussion.

PUBLIC COMMENT
None

DISCUSSION

Move and second to adopt Resolution 486.

We have an excellent School District because the community has supported it. Children come first. It’s been a tough couple of years. We need to invest in the future of our children. This is a ceremonial action to show belief in the strength our community,

VOTE
Resolution adopted unanimously 7-0

Study Item 9(a) Discussion of Proposed 2022 Human Services Allocations of American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) Funding

Margaret King, City Attorney

Before discussing this matter, I wanted to draw Council’s attention to State Law RCW 42.23.030 that prohibits an interest in contracts that may be approved by a municipal officer (including members of the Council). It states: No municipal officer shall be beneficially interested, directly or indirectly, in any contract which may be made by, through or under the supervision of such officer, in whole or in part, or which may be made for the benefit of his or her office, or accept, directly or indirectly, any compensation, gratuity or reward in connection with such contract from any other person beneficially interested therein.

Conflicts must be disclosed ahead of time.

We are not taking action tonight, but any Councilmember who feels they may have a conflict or potential conflict should contact her. If a Councilmember has a question, they should refrain from participating in or advocating for anything you feel you might have a conflict in. You may remain in this meeting as long as you don’t advocate for it.

CM Ramsdell disclosed that as a licensed mental health counselor, in 2022 he will be assuming, on a very part-time basis, a position as a clinical supervisor for Charm’d LLC which provides mental health counseling for East African immigrants. As a result he will be recusing himself from the vote when that time comes.

Colleen Kelly, Recreation, Cultural and Community Services Director, gave the presentation


The $7,533,842 in Federal ARPA funding the City will receive will cover COVID-19 eligible expenditures that are fully obligated by December 31, 2024. Budgeting these funds will happen through a 2022 budget amendment and as part of the 2023-2024 budget process.

We had an initial discussion with Council back in June and presented some high level recommendations regarding how to think about allocating these funds in Shoreline. At that time Council indicated its support to allocate $1.6M for human services.


Navigators will now be called Community Support Specialists which we think might be a more acceptable term to the general public.


Specifics around small businesses will be discussed at a later Council meeting.

We have found that many residents are still struggling to meet basic needs. There are significant federal, state and county resources for rent and utility assistance so they are not part of our recommended package.

Staff recommendations:
Because this is an evolving situation, and there is much we don’t know, we felt it was best to begin with 2022 and wait to see how things evolve and unfold.

Donations and Holiday Basket Grocery gift cards will go toward holiday food and gift support for Shoreline School students and their families.

Additional grocery cards are for distribution through other organizations that work with families that might not be attached to the school district (either without children or with children who are in private schools).

Flexible financial assistance is challenging to administer as there are only a few organizations in Shoreline that have programs to provide it. This money would go to those organizations to distribute.
  • Charm’d provides mental health support for immigrant and refugee individuals and families.
  • Grounded is for youth mental health specialists of color to support Black youth and other Youth of Color.
  • Canopy is tutoring and family support services for immigrant and refugee families (formerly called Turning Point).
  • Police requested emergency hotel vouchers mostly for domestic violence victims, or other dangerous situations that require immediate temporary housing.
  • The City currently runs a small grant program called Love Your Community Grants. This is not for neighborhood associations (who have a separate grant program). This is a pilot for other groups but it started at the same time as the pandemic so we don’t know how it will work.
In summary,
  • Total 2022 recommendations: $518,000
  • Balance remaining for future allocation: $994,500
Discussion

It’s great that after all of these expenditures, we would still have almost one million dollars in the account.

The $100,000 flexible financial assistance, would we contract that out with folks with operations in place, or is the City going to manage it? How will we track it?
  • Reply: we are recommending that this money be contracted out to organizations that have operations in place for managing flexible funding assistance and have the internal mechanism to do the necessary tracking. The advantage of flexible financial assistance is it can be used for car repairs or work boots that allow someone to get a job. These things are very hard to get funding for in other places. We are looking at Center for Human Services, Canopy (Turning Point), and a smaller organization called Shoreline Community Care to contract with.

Flexible financial assistance is a great idea. Is there a maximum amount per request? So it doesn’t all go to the first comers?
  • Reply: we see these initial allocations as our first best guess - we will have to adjust as we see how it develops. That’s one of the advantages of having the excess $900k to draw from as needed.

Is there a comfort level with staff that these flexible funds will get out to the communities that need the support, communities that don’t necessarily have access to or engage with certain providers?
  • Reply: These are organizations that are already managing funds like this. We will promote the investments we are making so people are aware of them, and we have dedicated staff available to actively assist residents in accessing us (dedicated phone line, dedicated email, a website that will go live in February).

But we’ll send them from the Shoreline website to another website to actually fill out the forms. And the forms won’t live on the City’s website.
  • Reply: True because the agencies that we work with have way more capacity. It’s better to come to the City because we can assist them and make it less daunting. We don’t want to refer people into a blackhole and not achieve anything. We have staff who can walk them through the process.

Do you have a sense of how strict the requirements are in terms of funding allocations for human services? With screening and monitoring it can take time. We want to streamline the process. When people need money they need it now if not last week or last month. I want to make sure these funds go out quickly to the people who need them. We have other grants that have expired. Inflation is rising fast. We need funds out quickly - less screening and a streamlined process to make it easier.
  • Reply: We have actually front loaded that work so it’s basically done. We are ready to go.

Holiday gift card baskets, that money will be spent in Nov-Dec . We need to put more into the other gift cards now rather than wait for the holidays. People are struggling today. We need to push funds out faster - sooner than later will better help the community.

Will there be some way to make sure it all goes to Shoreline residents because other cities have their own access. I don’t want our system taken advantage of. We have more than enough need in our community after two years of COVID. The money will go pretty quickly.

I’m very concerned about when the Moratorium for eviction ends and people need to find new housing in a very short time. All these programs will be needed.

Limited term navigators. How long is the term?
  • Reply: the maximum term is 3 years. But we actually hired them for 2 years with an option to extend to 3 years as we see the need develop.

I like the impressive list of recommendations, diversity of organizations, and trusting the expertise of these organizations.

We all agree that we need to get the money out quickly because it is needed now. I don’t want too much wait and see. We need to make decisions now. I agree gift cards for holidays could come from a later release of funds and shift those gift cards up to earlier in year.

Money needs to be used well and effectively. What performance measurements are in place to make sure that we’re doing appropriate evaluations of the programs? Will that data be made available? I think that would be interesting to the public as well as the Council.
  • Reply: outcome is measured quarterly in expected units of services but that doesn’t really provide an evaluation. Evaluation is trickier because it’s different from data collection, as you know. Nonprofits don’t have resources to access that kind of information. We want to make sure that Shoreline residents are being served in reasonable numbers for the investment we are making.

Does the City do any checking if all of the information comes from the various non-profits? Does the city validate it in any way?
  • Reply: we visit the organization and have one-on-one meetings. These are mostly organizations we are familiar with having worked with them over the years. There are boilerplate requirements in the contract. Quarterly invoices must be submitted with the data reports on the service units provided and they are checked before payment is made. We hope dedicated staff will be helpful here since we have additional staff that we don’t usually have. We don’t want all the money that we expect to last a year be gone in 3 months.

Not everybody has school-age kids so we need to make sure that the elderly and other people don’t fall through the cracks

Have we previously funded the grocery cards? What funds did we use?
  • Reply: we used CARES Act funding. We did direct distribution with recommendations from family advocates. I think we did two rounds of that. Funding has always been pandemic specific (not through the City general fund). And this time we have the separate grocery cards for people who do not have a connection with the school district.

Edmonds is doing a household support program where they are giving out up to $2,500 grants to families. There are pros and cons to what we’re doing and what Edmonds is doing. Edmonds recognizes people need cash. Our gift card is specifically for food. There are other options to consider if there are problems with the gift card program.

If there is Council consensus to support these recommendations, staff will move forward with implementation and prepare a budget amendment to authorize the proposed expenditures.

Contracts come back on consent so we can get to them quickly.

Are there any objections to proceeding on this basis?

Would the gift card thing be contracted out.
  • Reply: We made the direct purchase so it’s not a contracted item.

Have we budgeted $50,000?
  • Reply: the actual budget authority will happen as part of the budget amendment process so everything that we’re bringing to you tonight will get rolled into the budget amendment as part of the expenditure authority. The specific programs will have contracts. The grocery cards we will purchase directly and then distribute them to our partners either through the gift baskets program or through other community based organizations that are working either with seniors or other populations that are struggling to meet their needs. That will be a distribution process, not a contracting process.

So if a CM wanted to increase a particular line item it would be part of the reconciliation process where we would change that amount.
  • Reply Debbie Tarry: Just a reminder we do adopt the budget at the fund level. We have enough budget authority - we just need to know if Council is supportive of this. Even though we will come back with the budget amended, we don’t have to wait until that happens because we have enough budget authority in our biennial budget to get the cards purchased.

If we want to increase the amount, where would we have the discussion?
  • Debbie Tarry: My suggestion would be for us to move forward with what staff recommended. We’ll be working with our partners to understand how fast they are going out. If it’s happening quickly, we can purchase more gift cards. We’re trying to understand what the demand is. We can be nimble enough to increase it in a pretty short order if we need to. Doing large enough sums provides us with a discount.

When do we start talking about the 2023 money?
  • Reply: the funds are not actually delineated into 2022, 2023, 2024 dollars. We used an artificial delineation in order to plan for 23 and 24. We could spend all of the money this year if that’s what we felt we needed to do, or we could delay it until the end of 2024. It’s not like our annual budget. It’s just what is the need and when do we think the resources should be deployed and in what way. That is why there is so much flexibility.

Will Council have a chance to talk about this rather than just being on Consent Calendar as we get closer to talking about larger amounts of money?
  • Reply Mayor Scully: What will come to us on Consent is a particular individual contract so it won’t be a discussion of the grocery cards - it will be asking Council to approve or disapprove a contract with XYZ in “this" amount. And we can pull it from Consent for additional discussion if necessary. We have the authority from Council Action to change budget categories and amend the budget, either through the regular budget process or as a one-off. Given what we’ve heard tonight and given the flexibility, what I suggest is we stay in contact with staff and when we have concerns we ask staff to put another study session on.
Council is in agreement.

MEETING ADJOURNED



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Pool demolition underway -- expected to be down by end of next week

Friday, January 28, 2022

Shoreline Pool photo courtesy City of Shoreline

Demolition of the pool began in earnest this week. The General Contractor, Forma Construction, expects the structure to be down by the end of next week. Work then shifts to foundation removal and backfill. The site will then be capped with topsoil and hydro-seed.

Photo courtesy City of Shoreline

The City of Shoreline is working with the School District on possible uses for the site, which may include constructing a picnic shelter. The City received a State Department of Commerce grant last year for a picnic shelter and first choice would be the former pool site.

The pool property is adjacent to Shoreline Park, two soccer fields, and tennis courts. There are already restrooms and concrete walkways.

Last year, with the pool closed, Shorewood girls' swim team was able to hold their practices and meets at the outdoor, privately owned Innis Arden pool. Shorecrest girls' held their practices and meets at the outdoor, privately owned Sheridan Beach pool.

Both dive teams trained at Mariner High School in Everett.




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Local pharmacies will have free N95 masks

Pick up your N95 masks at no cost - when they're in stock. 

The DOH says that local pharmacies should start receiving the masks in the coming days. Some already are handing them out.

The goal is that each pharmacy will give each person three masks, depending on their stock.

N95 masks can be worn more than once.

Check here for all locations in the United States:
http://www.cdc.gov/.../reta.../participating-pharmacies.html

Washington state - this is the list for Washington state. Local stores are highlighted.

  • Albertsons Companies, Inc. (including Osco, Jewel-Osco, Albertsons, Albertsons Market, Safeway, Tom Thumb, Star Market, Shaw’s, Haggen, Acme, Randalls, Carrs, Market Street, United, Vons, Pavilions, Amigos, Lucky’s, Pak n Save, Sav-On)
  • Costco Wholesale Corp.
  • CPESN USA, LLC
  • CVS Pharmacy, Inc. (including Long’s)
  • Good Neighbor Pharmacy and AmerisourceBergen Drug Corporation’s pharmacy services administrative organization (PSAO), Elevate Provider Network
  • Health Mart Pharmacies
  • LeaderNET and The Medicine Shoppe Pharmacy, Cardinal Health’s PSAOs
  • Managed Health Care Associates (retail and long-term care pharmacies)
  • Rite Aid Corp. Rite Aid, Bartells.
  • The Kroger Co. (including Kroger, Harris Teeter, Fred Meyer, Fry’s, Ralphs, King Soopers, Smiths, City Market, Dillons, Mariano’s, Pick-n-Save, Copps, Metro Market, QFC)
  • Topco Associates, LLC (including Acme Fresh Markets, Associated Food Stores, Bashas, Big-Y Pharmacy and Wellness Center, Brookshire’s Pharmacy, Super One Pharmacy, FRESH by Brookshire’s Pharmacy, Coborn’s Pharmacy, Cash Wise Pharmacy, MarketPlace Pharmacy, Giant Eagle, Hartig Drug Company, King Kullen, Food City Pharmacy, Ingles Pharmacy, Raley’s, Bel Air, Nob Hill Pharmacies, Save Mart Pharmacies, Lucky Pharmacies, SpartanNash, Price Chopper, Market 32, Tops Friendly Markets, ShopRite, Wegmans, Weis Markets, Inc.)
  • Walgreens (including Duane Reade)
  • Walmart, Inc. (including Sam’s Club)

The masks are part of a federal program to get everyone into high quality masks to protect against omicron and the emerging permutations of the virus.


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Extended lane restrictions for work on NE 145th St from 3rd Ave NE to 8th Ave NE


Work has been extended to February 4th. Sound Transit will continue night lane restrictions on both Eastbound and Westbound directions of NE 145th St (WA-532) from 3rd Ave NE to 8th Ave NE, 

Wednesday night, February 2, 2022 to Friday morning, February 4th from 9:00pm to 5:00am.

Work is performed at night to minimize traffic impacts. These night-time lane restrictions will be utilized for potholing work just east of 5th Ave NE on NE 145th St.

Local access will be maintained. For access to and from your driveway, flag down a construction worker.



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Jobs: City of Shoreline Engineer II - Traffic

City of Shoreline
Engineer II - Traffic

CLOSING DATE: 2/13/22 11:59 PM

GENERAL SUMMARY

Shoreline is an inclusive City that endeavors to build a work culture which embraces diversity, encourages participation, and promotes equity.

The Traffic Services team, a part of the City’s Public Works Department, leads and supports a broad variety of transportation planning, operations, development and capital functions citywide. The Engineer II – Traffic position manages key traffic infrastructure - including the traffic signal system, traffic ITS components, school zone flashers, beacons, radar speed signs, and the street light program - playing a central role in keeping Shoreline moving safely and efficiently.

Employees Working Remotely: The City is implementing a remote work policy that will allow staff to work up to three remote days a week; however, during the 6-month probationary period, your supervisor may establish an alternate schedule of work performed at City Hall. Full-time remote work is not an option. Once hired, employees must reside in the State of Washington.

COVID-19 Vaccination Requirement: A candidate selected and offered the job must demonstrate proof of vaccination against Covid-19. A list of acceptable documents to provide verification can be reviewed here.

The City's mission is to fulfill the community’s vision through highly valued public service. Our employees work relentlessly to achieve organizational goals while embracing the City’s values. City Mission, Values, and Goals

To demonstrate skills and interest, please complete the application and Supplemental Questions in lieu of a cover letter or a resume. (This application does not allow for attachments. Providing complete responses in the Supplemental Questions section will help us determine your qualifications for the job.)

DEFINITION
Manage the City’s traffic signal system including development and optimization of signal timing plans, programming controllers, and directing maintenance activities. Investigate traffic operational or safety concerns identified by the public. Manage the planning, design, and construction of assigned public works traffic capital projects. Provide professional traffic engineering review of road improvement plans for compliance with traffic engineering standards.


Job description and application



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Jobs: City of Shoreline Extra Help – Expert Professional (Finance Analyst)

City of Shoreline
Extra Help – Expert Professional (Finance Analyst)

CLOSING DATE: 2/02/22 11:59 PM

GENERAL SUMMARY

Shoreline is an inclusive City that endeavors to build a work culture which embraces diversity, encourages participation, and promotes equity.

Serve as a Finance Analyst in the Finance Operations group supporting monthly accounting functions. This position reports to the City’s Finance Manager.

Work Schedule:

This position is anticipated to end on January 31, 2023. Hours not to exceed an average of 29 hours per week and 1,040 per year over the duration of the assignment

Work will be accomplished either on site at City Hall or remotely with access to City's technical resources. Assigned tasks will drive the schedule.

COVID-19 Vaccination Requirement: A candidate selected and offered the job must demonstrate proof of vaccination against Covid-19. A list of acceptable documents to provide verification can be reviewed here.

Job description and application



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Jobs: City of Shoreline Engineer II – Wastewater Capital Projects

City of Shoreline
Engineer II – Wastewater Capital Projects

CLOSING DATE: 2/08/22 11:59 PM

GENERAL SUMMARY

Shoreline is an inclusive City that endeavors to build a work culture which embraces diversity, encourages participation, and promotes equity.

The Capital Engineering Team, a part of the City’s Public Works Department, supports an annual Capital Improvement Program (CIP) between $50 million and $70 million across the wastewater, transportation, surface water, parks, and facilities business lines. We are a collaborative, supportive group of engineering project managers focused on continuously improving our project delivery and our workplace. We are growing and looking for a like-minded person to join our team.

The Engineer II – Wastewater Capital Projects position will plan, manage and design wastewater capital projects from inception through construction close-out in collaboration with the Wastewater Systems Engineer and other Utility Managers. We seek an individual with strong wastewater experience and expertise to play a key role in expanding the Capital Team’s capacity and capability. This position may also be called upon to manage delivery of capital projects in other City business lines as needed or directed. The ideal candidate will be able to work equally well independently and in inter-divisional teams to develop and deliver projects within established schedules and budgets.

Employees Working Remotely: The City is implementing a remote work policy that will allow staff to work up to three remote days a week; however, during the 6-month probationary period, your supervisor may establish an alternate schedule of work performed at City Hall. Full-time remote work is not an option. Once hired, employees must reside in the State of Washington.

COVID-19 Vaccination Requirement: A candidate selected and offered the job must demonstrate proof of vaccination against Covid-19. A list of acceptable documents to provide verification can be reviewed here.

The City's mission is to fulfill the community’s vision through highly valued public service. Our employees work relentlessly to achieve organizational goals while embracing the City’s values. City Mission, Values, and Goals

To demonstrate skills and interest, please complete the application and Supplemental Questions in lieu of a cover letter or a resume. (This application does not allow for attachments. Providing complete responses in the Supplemental Questions section will help us determine your qualifications for the job.)

DEFINITION
Manage the development and delivery of the most complex wastewater capital projects subject to strict deadlines, including managing public involvement, overseeing consultants, and meeting schedule and budget objectives. Coordinate assigned activities with other divisions, departments and outside agencies. Establish and maintain cooperative working relationships with co-workers, other departments, outside agencies, consultants, contractors and citizens, and provide highly responsible and complex project management and engineering support to City departments.

DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTICS
This is an advanced, journey – level classification. Positions at this level are distinguished from the Engineer I – Capital Projects classification by the level of license/certification required, the level of engineering and project management skills, the level of responsibility assumed and the complexity of duties assigned. Employees in this classification perform the most difficult and responsible types of duties on complex and high-profile capital projects and activities requiring an effective combination of planning, engineering, project management and communication skills, fluency in procedures related to assigned area of responsibility and the ability to work independently.

Job description and application



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Jobs: City of Shoreline Engineer II – Capital Projects (Transportation and Surface Water)

City of Shoreline
Engineer II – Capital Projects (Transportation and Surface Water)

CLOSING DATE: 2/07/22 11:59 PM

GENERAL SUMMARY

Shoreline is an inclusive City that endeavors to build a work culture which embraces diversity, encourages participation, and promotes equity.

The Capital Engineering Team, a part of the City’s Public Works Department, supports an annual Capital Improvement Program (CIP) between $50 million and $70 million across the transportation, surface water, wastewater, parks, and facilities business lines. We are a collaborative, supportive group of engineering project managers focused on continuously improving our project delivery and our workplace. We are growing and looking for a like-minded person to join our team.

The Engineer II – Capital Projects position plans, manages and designs capital projects across all City business lines, from inception through construction close-out. For this specific position, we seek an individual with strong transportation and surface water expertise to play a key role in expanding the Team’s capacity and capability. The ideal candidate will be able to work equally well independently and in inter-divisional teams to develop and deliver projects within established schedules and budgets.

Employees Working Remotely: The City is implementing a remote work policy that will allow staff to work up to three remote days a week; however, during the 6-month probationary period, your supervisor may establish an alternate schedule of work performed at City Hall. Full-time remote work is not an option. Once hired, employees must reside in the State of Washington.

COVID-19 Vaccination Requirement: A candidate selected and offered the job must demonstrate proof of vaccination against Covid-19. A list of acceptable documents to provide verification can be reviewed here.

The City's mission is to fulfill the community’s vision through highly valued public service. Our employees work relentlessly to achieve organizational goals while embracing the City’s values. City Mission, Values, and Goals

To demonstrate skills and interest, please complete the application and Supplemental Questions in lieu of a cover letter or a resume. (This application does not allow for attachments. Providing complete responses in the Supplemental Questions section will help us determine your qualifications for the job.)

DEFINITION
Manage the development of the most complex capital projects subject to strict deadlines, including managing public involvement, overseeing consultants, and meeting schedule and budget objectives. Coordinate assigned activities with other divisions, departments and outside agencies. Establish and maintain cooperative working relationships with co-workers, other departments, outside agencies, consultants, contractors and citizens, and provide highly responsible and complex project management and engineering support to City departments.

DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTICS
This is an advanced, journey – level classification. Positions at this level are distinguished from the Engineer I – Capital Projects classification by the level of license/certification required, the level of engineering and project management skills, the level of responsibility assumed and the complexity of duties assigned. Employees in this classification perform the most difficult and responsible types of duties on complex and high-profile capital projects and activities requiring an effective combination of planning, engineering, project management and communication skills, fluency in procedures related to assigned area of responsibility and the ability to work independently.

Job description and application


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Jobs: City of Shoreline Wastewater Engineer

City of Shoreline
Engineer II - Wastewater (Systems)

CLOSING DATE: 2/06/22 11:59 PM

GENERAL SUMMARY

Shoreline is an inclusive City that endeavors to build a work culture which embraces diversity, encourages participation, and promotes equity.

The City of Shoreline’s Wastewater Utility is a progressive utility with a continuous improvement philosophy. We are looking for a likeminded person to join our team. The Utility is a wastewater collection and conveyance system with treatment services provided by others. The Utility serves a population of approximately 58,000 and has 190 miles of sewer main, 4,800 manholes, and 16 sewage lift stations.

The Wastewater Engineer II (Systems) position is the Utility’s expert resource for engineering knowledge related to wastewater system design, standards, operations and maintenance, and related regulations. The position’s primary activities include wastewater system planning, design review feedback for capital and development projects, managing the Utility’s capital program and infrastructure repair and replacement programs, managing hydraulic modeling, assessment of collection system problems, managing an on-call engineering and other professional services contracts, overseeing the City’s wastewater design standards and related regulatory compliance and working with and through management in the support of policy development and implementation.

The ideal candidate is a collaborative team player who self-manages and takes ownership of their work and works equally well with administrative, consultant, engineering, and operations and maintenance staff. We highly encourage creative problem-solving skills and a drive to improve. Training and professional growth opportunities are provided and supported.

Employees Working Remotely: The City is implementing a remote work policy that will allow staff to work up to three remote days a week, however during the 6-month probationary period your supervisor may establish an alternate schedule of work performed at City Hall. Full-time remote work is not an option. Once hired, employees must reside in the State of Washington

COVID-19 Vaccination Requirement: A candidate selected and offered the job must demonstrate proof of vaccination against Covid-19. A list of acceptable documents to provide verification can be reviewed here.

The City's mission is to fulfill the community’s vision through highly valued public service. Our employees work relentlessly to achieve organizational goals while embracing the City’s values. City Mission, Values, and Goals

To demonstrate skills and interest, please complete the application, please complete the Supplemental Questions in lieu of the cover letter. (This application does not allow for attachments. Providing complete responses in the Supplemental Questions section will help us determine your qualifications for the job.)

DEFINITION

To provide responsible professional and technical engineering, analysis, and project management in support of the City’s Wastewater Utility including managing projects, preparing feasibility studies and technical reports, managing consultant contracts, developing and meeting project/program budgets, establishing and maintaining cooperative relationships with co-workers, departments, outside agencies and citizens, and preparing and/or reviewing design of projects in support of development and/or capital projects.

DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTICS

This is an advanced journey level classification. Positions at this level are distinguished from the Engineer I - Wastewater by the license/certification achieved the level of responsibility assumed and the complexity of duties assigned. Employees perform the most difficult and responsible types of duties including the most complex projects and coordination. Employees at this level are required to be fully trained in all procedures related to assigned area of responsibility and to work independently.

Job description and application



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